Monday, 13 June 2016

HAWKWIND























"X in search of space"
Year:    1971
Country:    UK
City:    Devon
Label:    United Artists
Format:    CD , LP
Tracks:    6
Time:    45 min.
Genre:    rock
Style:             Krautrock            Space Rock

















The springtime of 1971 was already a confusing time in Hawkwind’s history, exacerbated by the first of many major personnel shakeups that would become as much a trademark of the band about as much as their consumption of illicit euphoriates and their organic, primitive space rock freak outs. At this time both bassist Thomas Crimble and audio generator operator Dikmik left the group (with the latter rejoining several months later) replaced by ex-Amon Düül 2 bassist Dave Anderson and sound mixer Del Dettmar filling in on electronics. One further pair had also attached themselves to the band when dancer Stacia (whose unscheduled appearance onstage with them at Glastonbury Fayre in June) and writer Robert Calvert (who began to make impromptu live appearances on vocals as well as contributing lyrics) were absorbed into the band alongside core members Dave Brock (guitar, vocals), Nik Turner (vocals, woodwinds) and Terry Ollis (drums). Completing the six man team of musicnauts whose sole offering together would be just this one album, “X In Search Of Space” it was freakiness itself. So freaky, that the concept behind it was that playing the record would free the group from a dimensional compression within the album itself, for as the following entry in the accompanying ‘Hawklog’ attested:“1027 hrs. 5 May 1971. Ladbroke Grove. Space/time supply indicators near to zero. Our thoughts are losing depth; soon they will fold into each other, into flatness, into nothing but surface. Our ship will fold like a cardboard file and the noises of our mind compress into a disc of shining black, spinning in eternity...”. And graphic designer Barney Bubbles’ killer sleeve design allowed for such release when played with a tri-directional fold out sleeve and intricate die-cut cover to approximate the shape of a space hawk spreading its wings to the four corners of chaos, eternity, infinity and The Void (the very places Hawkwind’s music described and expanded into) illustrated with inlaid photographs from one of their many free concerts under the Westway overpass in their native community of Ladbroke Grove. Also included within the album was a free, 24-page ‘Hawklog’ written by Robert Calvert and filled with information relating to scientific data, occult references, astrological tables, cartoons, and a travel log whose entries followed non-chronological progressions in time. And it was a perfect reflection of Hawkwind itself: a distilled collage of sci-fi scenarios, hippy values, psychedelic awareness, gnostic explorations and visions of time, space, thought and body into a D.I.Y. Spaceship Earth ethos.  Notable contributors have included "accidental" bassist Lemmy (who would go on to greater fame with Motörhead), Cream's Ginger Baker and science fiction writer Michael Moorcock. In fact, the song "Motörhead" inspired to write "Don't pay the poll tax" of the punk rock band THE EXPLOITED, according to its own singer Wattie Buchan. HAWKWIND are still active.
(*NOTE = this review was writen HERE ).
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"space ritual"
Year:    1973
Country:    UK
Label:    United Artists
Format:    CD , 2 x LP
Tracks:    17
Time:    87 min.
Genre:    rock
Style:            Space Rock            Krautrock        



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"warrior on the edge of time"
Year:    1975
Country:    UK
City:    Devon
Label:    United Artists
Format:    CD , LP
Tracks:    11
Time:    47 min.
Genre:    rock
Style:            Space Rock              Psychedelic Rock














Quintessential space rock, with cuts blending together, a story thread providing the continuity, and excellent recording techniques. Possibly the most cohesive of the Hawkwind albums, this also marked the last major release by the band of new material. This is the kind of album that you crank up, sit back, and listen to, while doing nothing else, because it takes you on a journey through space and time into a future of magic and mayhem. Definitely not music to nod off to, nor does it serve well as a party sound track, but an excellent example of a '70's concept album. Released in 1975, it compliments the previous Hawkwind release, "Hall Of The Mountain Grill", from 1974.
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